Kokoroba, Perfumed Card

A card with perfumed petals of Japanese paper.
Send a scented message to your loved one.

Kokoroba, Perfumed Card
FUJI (Wisteria)

FUJI (Wisteria)

UME (Plum Blossom)

UME (Plum Blossom)

TACHIBANA (Wild Orange Blossom)

TACHIBANA (Wild Orange Blossom)

TSUBAKI (Camellia)

TSUBAKI (Camellia)

Yet if not to you, to whom might I show it?
The flowering plum!
Only the knowing can know both its colour and its scent.

(After a poem by Kino Tomonori, Kokinwakashu anthology)

In another time, during the Heian period (794-1192), the Japanese expressed their thoughts in the form of poetry.
The poetic form usually adopted for love letters and other correspondence was the waka, a short poem of 31 syllables. These poems can express melancholy and sadness as much as a profound love of nature. However, more often than not they were declarations of love, called kokoroba in Japanese. The responses were also in the form of a poem. The message was perfumed with incense and attached to the branch of a blossoming tree. Expressing the essence of the sender's thoughts in only a few words, the poem was dispatched in this manner to the person for whom they were composed.