Perfumed green tea

Fields of green tea cover the slopes of a valley where a crystal clear stream flows.
When April arrives in Kawane, a village famous for its excellent tea, a soft, exquisite aroma emanates from small artisan factories and invades the neighbourhood.
To this fresh, green perfume I have added all the fragrance of the flowers found in Japan.

Perfumed green tea

Perfumed green tea: gold powder aroma.

A marriage of delicate perfumes that emerges above the aroma of green tea.

Perfumed green tea: gold powder aroma.

HANA (Flower)

A savour and aroma imbibed with elegance and refinement.

TSUKI (Moon)

A romantic bouquet married to a soft, serene savour.

KAZE (Wind)

A frank savour, full of freshness.
Perfumed green tea: gold powder aroma.

Perfumed green tea: floral aromas.

A marriage of 'Flowers' perfume, which varies according to the season, and the aroma of green tea.

SAKURA (Cherry Blossom)

SAKURA (Cherry Blossom)

Light and uplifting, creates a feeling of happiness, symbolized by the cherry blossom.

FUJI (Wisteria)

FUJI (Wisteria)

A crystalline aroma and full of freshness, relaxes the body and brings serenity to the mind.

UME (Plum Blossom)

UME (Plum Blossom)

Possesses an aroma which is both crystalline and soft. Its intensity brings to mind the flower.

TACHIBANA (Wild Orange Blossom)

TACHIBANA (Wild Orange Blossom)

A compelling fragrance. Bitter like the traditional Japanese taste.

TSUBAKI (Camellia)

TSUBAKI (Camellia)

An attractive flavour, a reminder of a distant orientalism.

Perfumed green tea: floral aromas.

The Green Tea Route

Tea first appeared in Japan during the Heian period (794-1192). It was introduced there by Buddhist monks who brought it from China in their baggage. At that time it was considered a stimulating drink that would help them concentrate and gather the spirit during meditation.

Later, during the Kamakura period (1192-1338), the popularity of tea as a remedy grew. The adage of the Zen master Eizai states that tea is “an elixir of long life, a remedy to cure all ills.”

In the 15th century, the monk Sen no Rikyu, founder of the Japanese tea ceremony, Cha no Yu, gave to tea its nobility and acclaim. Today, the Japanese tea ceremony, also known as the “Way of Tea”, still has many adepts both inside and outside Japan.

At the dawn of modern times, towards the end of the Edo period (1603-1868), green tea once again began to travel with the opening of Yokohama port to foreign trade.

The place of green tea in Japanese history and culture, and the bridge it built between Japan and the West, make it a symbol have made it a symbol.